Immigration reform without Washington

City and state policies can welcome immigrants, too.
By Peter J. Spiro

Thousands gathered in more than 70 cities nationwide last weekend to demand that Congress enact comprehensive immigration reform. Arizona’s recently enacted immigration law had galvanized the protesters, who see Washington as the antidote to anti-immigrant policy at the state level.

But immigration advocates should be careful what they wish for. Immigration is among the most unpredictable political issues in Washington. Recent history has shown that things can go very wrong for immigrants when a vocal minority is intensely opposed to immigration.

Advocates would do better to take their cause where they can be more confident of gains: cities and states that welcome immigrants regardless of their federal status.

Arizona’s law amounts to a self-inflicted wound, scaring away productive, taxpaying immigrants, legal or not. Other jurisdictions – Philadelphia included – can make Arizona’s loss their gain by working to advance immigrant interests in their own back yards.

The Philadelphia Inquirer

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2 Responses to Immigration reform without Washington

  1. therumpledone says:

    Is the US CODE UNCONSTITUTIONAL?

    US CODE TITLE 8 > CHAPTER 12 > SUBCHAPTER II > Part VIII > § 1325

    § 1325. Improper entry by alien

    TITLE 8 > CHAPTER 12 > SUBCHAPTER II > Part VIII > § 1324a

    § 1324a. Unlawful employment of aliens

    WE DO NOT NEED IMMIGRATION REFORM. WE NEED IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT.

    ENFORCE THE LAW

    We should treat immigrants like Mexico does:

    At present, Article 67 of Mexico’s Population Law says, “Authorities, whether federal, state or municipal … are required to demand that foreigners prove their legal presence in the country, before attending to any issues.”

    That would simplify things.

    Operation Wetback was a 1954 operation by the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) to remove about one million illegal immigrants from the southwestern United States, focusing on Mexican nationals.

    Simple question:

    What happens if someone jumps the fence and wanders around a gated community without an ID and a resident of the community calls the cops saying someone that doesn’t look like they belong here is roaming the streets? The cops arrive. They would ask the wanderer a few questions. If wanderer does not have a valid reason for being inside the gated community, the cops would escort them out, wouldn’t they? Isn’t a country, like the USA, a “gated community”, too?

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